Learn What Can Happen If VUR Isn’t Treated

What happens if VUR is not treated effectively?

Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a serious condition

Your child may outgrow VUR. The average age when a child may outgrow VUR is five or six years old. Usually this happens if your child has a mild case.

If it isn’t a mild case, it’s really important that VUR be treated to avoid long-term complications.

More severe grades of reflux are associated with lower rates of spontaneous resolution and a higher incidence of renal scarring.1

Continual UTIs can permanently damage the kidney

When a child has VUR, urine backs up into the kidney. Sometimes the urine contains bacteria that cause a urinary tract infection (UTI). Bacteria in the kidney can lead to damage over time, which may eventually lead to kidney failure and/or high blood pressure. Some kidney infections that develop suddenly can even be life threatening.

Ask your doctor to explain more about why VUR should be treated.

References:
  1. Baskin LS, Kogan BA, Stock JA. Handbook of Pediatric Urology Third Edition. Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer; 2019.